Author Topic: Original filenames in IPTC  (Read 3094 times)

Offline tomang

  • Newcomer
  • *
  • Posts: 10
    • View Profile
Original filenames in IPTC
« on: August 14, 2007, 09:06:26 am »
For some time I'd been struggling with how to retain the original file name with an image when it goes through all the renaming and repurposing that they go through, and I have only just come up with the answer. Now why would anyone need that? I write a lot of books and files get named by designers to the publisher's convention that embeds project numbers etc. But suppose a file gets corrupted, or suddenly they want to use it really big. I have to dig up the original and rework it, or reprocess a raw file. Until now, I'd have to rely on memory to find the thing because the original filename is lost. But now I can incoroporate the original filename with the IPTC data and use Spotlight to locate it within seconds.

Here's how: open the IPTC Stationery Pad, click in Object Name (or whatever cell you choose) and open Variables (fourth button on the bottom), then double-click on {filename} and make sure the Object Name is ticked in the box. On ingest the filename should be embedded in the image. I am steadily going through old folders to add filename to their IPTC data. Wish I'd worked this out earlier, which is why I'm sharing it with you.

Well, if you (Kirk and others) know all about this, do feel free to remove this. Thanks to Kirk and Camera Bits for a great little app.

Tom

Offline Kirk Baker

  • Senior Software Engineer
  • Camera Bits Staff
  • Superhero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 18603
    • View Profile
    • Camera Bits, Inc.
Re: Original filenames in IPTC
« Reply #1 on: August 14, 2007, 10:04:10 am »
Tom,

For some time I'd been struggling with how to retain the original file name with an image when it goes through all the renaming and repurposing that they go through, and I have only just come up with the answer. Now why would anyone need that? I write a lot of books and files get named by designers to the publisher's convention that embeds project numbers etc. But suppose a file gets corrupted, or suddenly they want to use it really big. I have to dig up the original and rework it, or reprocess a raw file. Until now, I'd have to rely on memory to find the thing because the original filename is lost. But now I can incoroporate the original filename with the IPTC data and use Spotlight to locate it within seconds.

Here's how: open the IPTC Stationery Pad, click in Object Name (or whatever cell you choose) and open Variables (fourth button on the bottom), then double-click on {filename} and make sure the Object Name is ticked in the box. On ingest the filename should be embedded in the image. I am steadily going through old folders to add filename to their IPTC data. Wish I'd worked this out earlier, which is why I'm sharing it with you.

Well, if you (Kirk and others) know all about this, do feel free to remove this. Thanks to Kirk and Camera Bits for a great little app.

Others have asked how to do exactly that and what you have outlined is pretty much what I have recommended they do.  There should be at least a few threads on this forum with that explanation, but sometimes it is difficult to come up with the search terms to find what you're looking for (besides the fact that the search interface on this forms leaves much to be desired.)

I'm glad you've got it worked out.

-Kirk

Offline Hayo Baan

  • Uber Member
  • ******
  • Posts: 1942
  • Professional Photographer and Workshop Leader
    • View Profile
    • Hayo Baan  Photography
Re: Original filenames in IPTC
« Reply #2 on: August 14, 2007, 11:34:46 pm »
Setting the object name to the original name upon ingest works flawlessly.  I found another way to achieve the same thing though: simply rename both the original and the changed file the same.

The naming scheme I use caters for this nicely AND keeps all files sortable and 100% unique between my two cameras: {datesort}_{timesortlong}_{model:6}

Upon ingest I ingest to two locations: one for the unaltered originals and one for the "to do".

Cheers,
    Hayo
Hayo Baan Photography
Web: www.hayobaan.nl
Blog: blog.hayobaan.nl
500px: 500px.com/HayoBaan
Facebook: facebook.com/HayoBaan

Offline Ulysses

  • Newcomer
  • *
  • Posts: 3
    • View Profile
Re: Original filenames in IPTC
« Reply #3 on: August 28, 2018, 07:58:21 pm »
I'm sorry to resurrect such an old thread. But I thought it might be helpful to keep my question under the same topic.

For years while renaming files with Photo Mechanic I've been using the method described in the original post, using the {filename} variable in the Title/Object Name box of the IPTC Status section. However, if these images are uploaded to Facebook, this original filename is displayed as if it's the caption for that image. But I neither want nor need this original filename to display to the public as it causes confusion over the files' current name.

Is there some other location I can place the {filename} variable so as to preserve the original filename for these images, which won't get picked up by Facebook?

Offline Kirk Baker

  • Senior Software Engineer
  • Camera Bits Staff
  • Superhero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 18603
    • View Profile
    • Camera Bits, Inc.
Re: Original filenames in IPTC
« Reply #4 on: August 28, 2018, 08:19:20 pm »
I'm sorry to resurrect such an old thread. But I thought it might be helpful to keep my question under the same topic.

For years while renaming files with Photo Mechanic I've been using the method described in the original post, using the {filename} variable in the Title/Object Name box of the IPTC Status section. However, if these images are uploaded to Facebook, this original filename is displayed as if it's the caption for that image. But I neither want nor need this original filename to display to the public as it causes confusion over the files' current name.

Is there some other location I can place the {filename} variable so as to preserve the original filename for these images, which won't get picked up by Facebook?

Sure.  You can use any field you like, but I suggest experimenting and find out what Facebook picks up on and avoid those fields.

I'd try Special Instructions first.

-Kirk